Victor Davis Hanson

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Apollonius
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Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Apollonius » Sun Jan 22, 2017 8:11 am


Victor Davis Hanson

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victor_Davis_Hanson

Victor Davis Hanson (born September 5, 1953 in Fowler, California) is an American military historian, columnist, former classics professor, and scholar of ancient agrarian and military history. He has been a commentator on modern warfare and contemporary politics for National Review, The Washington Times and other media outlets. He is a professor emeritus of classics at California State University, Fresno, and is currently the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow in classics and military history at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. He chairs the Hoover working group on Military History and Contemporary Conflict as well as being the general editor of the Hoover online journal, Strategika. He has been a visiting professor at Hillsdale College where he teaches an intensive course on world, ancient or military history in the autumn semester, as the Wayne and Marcia Buske Distinguished Fellow in History since 2004.[1] Hanson is perhaps best known for his 2001 bookCarnage and Culture: Landmark Battles in the Rise of Western Power, a New York Times best-selling book.

Hanson was awarded the National Humanities Medal in 2007 by President George W. Bush, and was a presidential appointee in 2007-2008 on the American Battle Monuments Commission that oversees the cemeteries of and monuments of U.S. war dead abroad. Hanson is a student of current affairs, particularly regarding the U.S. in the Middle East, national defense issues and illegal immigration. He is also a fifth-generation farmer, growing almonds on a family farm in Selma, California where he resides, and is a commentator on social trends related to farming and agrarianism.

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Apollonius
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Re: Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Apollonius » Sun Jan 22, 2017 8:20 am

In a way Hanson represents something close to my ideal, someone interested in history and ideas, and yet is still in touch with the Earth.



I've worked in academic environments, if it can be called work. As our author points out, often most of one's time is spent jockeying for position in the socio-political environment.



But what truly amazes me, is that so many of these academics are not particularly well read, or at least not widely read. Perhaps they are too busy working on the paper they hope to publish proving another improbable theory to spend any time reading. Guess I shouldn't talk. My most major accomplishment might be installing a floor or growing something obscenely huge.

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Apollonius
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Re: Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Apollonius » Sun Jan 22, 2017 8:22 am

Some recent favourites:



The oldest divide - Victor Davis Hanson, City Journal, Autumn 2015
http://www.city-journal.org/html/oldest ... 14042.html




Imagine there's no border - Victor Davis Hanson, City Journal, Summer 2016
http://www.city-journal.org/html/imagin ... 14608.html




Fifteen easy ways to ruin the Middle East
- Victor Davis Hanson, 5 January 2017
http://victorhanson.com/wordpress/fifte ... ddle-east/

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Re: Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Booklady » Wed Jan 25, 2017 6:49 pm

Prosperity Is Destiny

Victor Davis Hanson January 24, 2017

"Economic growth cuts through political orthodoxy; economic stagnation intensifies it. Regrettably or not, prosperity, not character per se, determines a president's political fate."

Great article!
A saucer of cream will do for me, thank you for your kindness.

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Apollonius
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Re: Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Apollonius » Fri Jan 27, 2017 1:04 pm

Fake news: Postmodernism by another name - Victor Davis Hanson, 26 January 2017
http://victorhanson.com/wordpress/fake- ... ther-name/


... No one has described the methodology of fake news better than Ben Rhodes, a deputy national security advisor for Barack Obama and brother of the president of CBS News, David Rhodes. Ben Rhodes cynically bragged about how the Obama administration had sold the dubious Iran deal through misinformation picked up by an adolescent but sympathetic media (for which Rhodes had only contempt). As Rhodes put it, "The average reporter we talk to is 27 years old, and their only reporting experience consists of being around political campaigns. That’s a sea change. They literally know nothing."

[...]

What unites these fake news narratives and gives them greater media resonance than other fables and urban myths is again their progressive resonance. Fake news can become a means to advance supposedly noble ends of racial, gender, class, or environmental justice—such as the need for new sexual assault protocols on campuses. Those larger aims supersede bothersome and inconvenient factual details. The larger "truth" of fake news lives on even after its facts have been utterly debunked.

And indeed, the fake news mindset ultimately can be traced back to the campus. Academic postmodernism derides facts and absolutes, and insists that there are only narratives and interpretations that gain credence, depending on the power of the story-teller. In other words, white male establishment reactionaries have set up fictive rules of "absolute" truth and "unimpeachable" facts, and they have further consolidated their privilege by forcing the Other to buy into their biased and capricious notions of discriminating against one narrative over another.

The work of French postmodernists—such as Michael Foucault and Jacques Derrida that mesmerized academics in the 1980s with rehashed Nietzschean banalities about the absence of facts and the primacy of interpretation—has now been filtered by the media to a nationwide audience. If the mythical exclamation "hands up, don’t shoot" was useful in advancing a narrative of inordinate police attacks against African Americans, who cares whether he actually said it? And indeed, why privilege a particular set of elite investigatory methodologies to ascertain its veracity?

In sum, fake news is journalism’s popular version of the nihilism of campus postmodernism. To progressive journalists, advancing a leftwing political agenda is important enough to justify the creation of misleading narratives and outright falsehoods to deceive the public—to justify, in other words, the creation of fake but otherwise useful news.

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Re: Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Booklady » Fri Jan 27, 2017 1:10 pm

Thanks for posting this, Apollonius. Izzrdgrrl, also posted an essay on the same theme, both are quite central to what we are experiencing today.

http://www.davosman.org/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=115#p1463
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Re: Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Doc » Mon Jan 30, 2017 11:21 am

I will put this here as it appears to me where it belongs.


Trial Balloon for a Coup?
Analyzing the news of the past 24 hours
I am not saying that this story has anything to do with reality but it does seem to point to the motives behind it. Left Wing Destabilization of a democratically elected President to make way for a left wing coup. Seems like some after losing the election and have gone completely off the deep end.
“"I fancied myself as some kind of god....It is a sort of disease when you consider yourself some kind of god, the creator of everything, but I feel comfortable about it now since I began to live it out.” -- George Soros

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Apollonius
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Re: Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Apollonius » Fri Feb 03, 2017 10:00 am

Trump, the elites, and the deplorables - Victor Davis Hanson interviewed by Aaron M. Renn, City Journal, 2 February 2017
https://www.city-journal.org/html/trump ... 14999.html

... Aaron Renn: You talk about the language and one of the things you do mention is that rural people have a simple, direct language, and Trump resonated with them. And as I was rereading your article today preparing for this, I thought about a video that has been floating around the internet of a woman who is running for chair of the DNC, and in it she went on about a four or five-minute rampage talking about how white people needed to talk less...

Victor Davis Hanson: I saw that, I did.

Aaron Renn: ...say nothing, and just listen to people of color. She said my job is to listen and be a voice and shut other white people down when they want to interrupt. And as I'm watching this I realize of course she doesn't really mean that, because here she is surrounded by people of color, she is a white person, and she won't shut up. She just keeps running her mouth. And there's a certain theatrical element to the way people in these urban progressive circles communicate. You think of that Williamsburg hipster irony, I'm wearing the trucker cap but I'm doing it ironically. There's almost a performance art to it. How do rural people respond when they hear this type of communication?

Victor Davis Hanson: They just get sick of it. So when they hear - I think her name was Brown - when they see something like that, the degree they even watch it or it comes to their attention, they just think she is a hollow person, she is inauthentic, because the logic of her tirade was that she should get out of the race if she feels so bad about being white and there are other minority candidates that need a chance to be heard, then she should just shut up and get out and let them have it by virtue of their race. But see, Trump was saying that these people are inauthentic, they don't really believe that. It's sort of a virtue signaling. So when they tell you they don't believe in water transfers for farming, they do believe in water transfers from Hetch Hetchy to San Francisco for their own water. And when they say - when Barbara Boxer says I am against any more dams, she's not really against dams for Rancho Mirage where she plays golf. Or when people say well, I'm for wind and solar in California, but that's usually people on the coast who live in moderate climates where they don't have big power bills, and on, and on, and on. So I think what has happened over the years is that the media and the elite have created this contempt, this you know, it's just - I don't know what other word there is for it. When you have Jonathan Gruber laughing about deceiving the supposedly stupid American people or Ben Rhodes saying that he created an echo chamber because the reporters even are stupid, and the Colin Kaepernick, or pajama boy, the poster boy for Obamacare, all of these symbols to people outside of the coast that they are ridiculous. They are just people who are hollow. They don't know how to use their hands, they don't live in the real world, they don't have to meet a payroll, they don't live on a minimum wage. And I think the elite white people that do this, in their experience, they hang around mostly with wealthy minorities. And so they think that if because somebody is black or Hispanic and makes $200,000 a year like they do, therefore that person's oppressed. And so even the minorities of Van Jones or the people who are on MSNBC, they have no connection. Whoopi Goldberg - they have no connection with the working classes of any color. And I think Trump bought into that. And so when he talked to black people before and after the election, he deliberately sought out people who didn't sound like wealthy white people, which is what the liberal elite do often. And one other thing, I think he was telling us at least subliminally that white people are a very diverse group. So when minorities keep saying check your privilege and they go on these rants, and white liberal elites go on these rants, it's just sort of an incestuous little, small group but I don't think a Van Jones or I don't think a Juan Williams or any of these people would go out to Dayton, or they would go to North Dakota, or they would go to Bakersfield, and they’d talk the same way to white people as they do to coastal white people. So they're been inured to a certain type of white person who is guilty, who virtue signals constantly, condescending, and they don't like them but they attack them all the time, whereas I think Trump represents other white people who don't have that privilege, and influence, and money, but are much more authentic and they would not tolerate that type of abuse and I think that minorities would appreciate that they didn't. They'd have a greater respect for them because I think we are starting to see that this elite Left movement, wealthy, white, liberal, coastal elite, it's sort of a psychological process that the more signals they can transmit that they are liberal, the more they live these apartheid existences. So the woman that was on the DNC, Ms. Brown, says she is from White, Idaho. She doesn't sound like anybody I know in Idaho. She sounds like California or an East Coast transplant. And she probably is very wealthy, and she is probably not involved in the cattle, or oil, or coal business. And she hangs around with people like herself. But I don't think she'd talk that way if she went into downtown Boise to a cattleman's group and said this about white people. She wouldn't do it. So a lot of these people are opportunistic and they are almost bullies as well. ...

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Re: Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Apollonius » Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:38 am


The deplorables shout back
- Victor Davis Hanson, 16 February 2017
http://victorhanson.com/wordpress/the-d ... hout-back/


... Some object that Trumpism is pure nihilism and a vandal act rather than a constructive recalibration. Perhaps. But red-state America shouted back that if those who demanded open borders never themselves lived the consequences of open borders, then there would be no open borders. If those who proposed absolute free transfers of capital and jobs always expected others to lose money and jobs as the cost of the bargain, then there would be no such unlimited free flows. If the media were continually to stereotype and condescend to others, then they themselves would be stereotyped and talked down to.

For a brief moment in 2016, rural America shouted that the last shall be first, and first shall be last. Before we write off this retort that led to Trump as a mindless paroxysm, remember that it was not those in Toledo, Billings, Montgomery, or Red Bluff who piled up $20 trillion in collective debt, nearly destroyed the health care system, set the Middle East afire, turned the campus into Animal Farm, or transformed Hollywood into 1984-style widescreen indoctrination.

Trump was rural America’s shout back. One way or another, he will be its last. Either Trump will fail to restore prosperity and influence to the hinterland and thus even as president go the way of a flash-in-the-pan, would-be president Ross Perot—or he will succeed and thus make a like-minded successor superfluous.

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Apollonius
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Re: Victor Davis Hanson

Post by Apollonius » Tue Mar 21, 2017 2:04 pm

Monasteries of the mind - Victor Davis Hanson, 21 March 2017
http://victorhanson.com/wordpress/monas ... -the-mind/

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